Books

Book Review: The Dead Zone by Stephen King

(3 of 5 stars) I picked this one up after reading the description of it from Stephen King himself in On Writing.  The basic idea was to create a sympathetic political assassin. The thing is: a lot of King's descriptions of the politician reminded me a lot of today's political climate and Trump. Trump is no where NEAR as evil as the politician in this book, but there were aspects of his campaign that reminded me of Trump. So, I wanted to see how he told this story.  His approach is interesting, but I found it ultimately dissatisfying. I understand that this book is a character study, but the ending still felt rushed and wasn't a sufficient pay off for everything I'd invested in the book up to that point.

By Trey McIntyre, ago
Books

Book Review: California Bones by Greg Van Eekhout

(4 of 5 stars) I picked this one up because it's the Sword & Laser Book of the Month and because I was in the mood for an urban fantasy. I was so tickled to discover that not only does this book have an interesting magic system, but it's also a heist novel.  Even if it's slightly cliched at points, it's lightweight, fast paced, and very fun.  Recommended reading for the beach, pool, or if you're up late trying to keep a fussy baby sleeping.

By Trey McIntyre, ago
Books

Book Review: On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

King is a real master of commonplace language and reading through this book exemplifies his ability to make long passages of text sound conversational and interesting.  The memoir portions of the book are interesting and endear him to me, but I was reading for the portion about writing.  A lot of what he says is advice you'll hear everywhere.  Some of it is just his opinion about how to write well and although it is spoken as gospel should not, in my -- not a published author and not likely to ever reach his level of renown -- opinion, be regarded as such.  But there are a lot of real gems here.  And what he says explains a lot to me about his writing style.  I would definitely recommend this book to aspiring writers just because it is so well-expressed from start to end.

By Trey McIntyre, ago
Books

Book Review: Oathbringer (Stormlight Archive #3) by Brandon Sanderson

I didn't enjoy this book as much as the previous two. A big part of the sense of wonder and discovery from those book is lost as the characters deal with all the problems that have popped up.  There's some weird character stuff going on in this one and ultimately I didn't really enjoy the heroes as much as I did in the previous books... except for Lift.  She is always awesome.

By Trey McIntyre, ago
Books

Book Review: The Giver

SUMMARY: (5 of 5 stars) I'd never even heard of this book until a friend mentioned it on Facebook as an example of dystopian fiction, but apparently all of my friends have and they loved it. I did not enjoy reading this book because it's horrifying and painful to read, but it's a good book and a very quick read. It's the story of a boy who is born into a society of near-perfect equality, but is assigned the role of "Receiver" for his community. And in training for his life's work, he starts to understand all sorts of horrible things about life there.

By Trey McIntyre, ago
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