Egg Donor Problems

UUUGGGGHHHHHHH.

OK. So, I haven’t been good about writing about our actual process, so I’m aware that you’re missing a lot of backstory here. I’ll catch you up at some point.  Here’s the short version:

As of this moment right now, we have a “gestational carrier” lined up and waiting. Our IVF doctor is slaying every day. And by “slaying” I mean “creating new life using frankly AMAZING technology and science.”  And basically everything is ready to go.

Except the eggs.

The first donor we selected failed the medical screening after testing positive for cocaine.

The second donor we selected got pregnant because she apparently didn’t understand that when our IVF doctor removed her NuvaRing that she should not immediately run home and let her husband ejaculate inside of her. (But we’re really happy through gritted teeth for her growing family.)

We thankfully did not pay for any travel for the third donor we selected because it turned out that she couldn’t get enough time off from work for the extraction.

The fourth donor also didn’t even make it to the medical screening because when we inquired about her availability she revealed that she is departing on a spirit quest that will last several months and is not currently available. Not really. She didn’t say that. She said she was “traveling.” I choose to imagine that it means she is practicing her astral projection from a an quonset hut in a commune somewhere in the Berkshires.

So, yeah. Having spent almost six months on a part of this process that is typically estimated to take 60 – 90 days, we’re more than a little frustrated.

 

 

The Happiness Project

I’ve been a pretty voracious podcast listener for several years and one of the ‘casts on my list these days is Happier with Gretchen Rubin.  This morning when I hopped into the car to head to the office, a new episode was awaiting me that I thought was really great:

When I was writing my book The Happiness Project, I asked her, “What do you think is the secret of a happy life?” I was surprised by her answer, but as I thought about it, I’ve understood more and more what a good answer it is.

Justice O’Connor’s response was “work worth doing.”  If you take this as a reference to the broad virtue of productivity — which is how I think it is intended — this is a pretty profound statement.

Something to ponder!